Archive for September, 2016

Militant Monday | Miracles and the Resurrection

September 26th, 2016 by Vigilo

militant monday | miracles and the resurrectionThis week’s Militant Monday is a 25 minute audio clip, recorded in the 1960’s, by Archbishop Fulton J. Sheen. It should play automatically from this page. The following is a summary of this Monday’s topic, Miracles and the Resurrection. Read the rest of this entry »

Militant Monday | Knowledge of God and Free Will

September 19th, 2016 by Vigilo

This week’s Militant Monday is a 25 minute audio clip, recorded in the 1960’s, by Archbishop Fulton J. Sheen. It should play automatically from this page. The following is a summary of this Monday’s topic, Knowledge of God and Free Will. Read the rest of this entry »

Militant Monday | Revealed Truth

September 12th, 2016 by Vigilo

Militant Monday - Revealed TruthThis week’s Militant Monday is a 24 minute audio clip, recorded in the 1960’s, by Archbishop Fulton J. Sheen. It should play automatically from this page. The following is a summary of this Monday’s topic, Revealed Truth. Read the rest of this entry »

Internet Free Speech may be nearing it’s end. On October 1 2016, the United States is slated to cede control of the internet.

Lately, we have heard presidential candidate Donald Trump advocating for Americanism over Globalism. If true, this topic of internet free speech must be thrust into his platform. The government handing over jurisdiction (through ICANN) of the internet to the global cabal is the greatest modern assault on free speech. Considering that journalism is dead among major corporate media, we often need to rely on an unshackled internet to get honest news.

Below are three articles concerning the end of internet free speech. “Secret Board Resolution Paved Way In ICANN Internet Globalization Agenda” “UN Could Take Over ICANN, and the Internet, Oct. 1” and “Leaked Soros Document Calls For Regulating Internet To Favor ‘Open Society’ Supporters”

Forward this to your friends and family. We must not lose internet free speech, we must not allow control to be given to global governance….

 

Secret Board Resolution Paved Way In ICANN Internet Globalization written by Daniel Taylor

Update: Two years after Old-Thinker News first reported on this story, it has become more important than ever. The Wall Street Journal and others are now admitting that “When the Obama administration announced its plan to give up U.S. protection of the internet, it promised the United Nations would never take control. But because of the administration’s naiveté or arrogance, U.N. control is the likely result…”

Corwin: ICANN CEO Fadi Chehade passed secret resolutions, used NSA spy leaks as “false premise” to strip control from U.S.

Philip Corwin, Founding principal of Virtualaw LLC, and ICANN watchdog for the Internet Commerce Association, spoke out recently at the 49th ICANN meeting. ICANN (Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers) is in charge of assigning domain names and IP addresses on the internet. Until now, the United States has had contractual oversight for the organization.

Singapore hosted the historic ICANN meeting, which discussed the future of internet governance after the United States ceded control. Singapore has a poor track record of internet freedom. Terence Lee writes in a paper for Surveillance and Society that internet regulation in Singapore “… hinges on an ideology of control with the sole aim of producing law-abiding, self-regulated and therefore, economically productive, docile and compliant citizens.”

During the meeting, Corwin expressed his concern that the United States ceding control of the internet was based on the “false premise” that NSA spy revelations required a massive change at ICANN. Corwin also came out against pervasive globalization.

“I am a globalization skeptic, which does not mean that I’m against globalization in the abstract. It means I have great concerns about the quest for globalization that’s going on right now. We are clearly in a time for ICANN of hope and change, that makes me very nervous because hope is not always rewarded and change is not always for the better. I’m also a firm believer in the maxim if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.”

Corwin also revealed that ICANN CEO Fadi Chehade passed secret resolutions to further the goal of “an internet cooperation agenda.” Corwin stated,

“In the last period, particularly in the question which was out there since last summer of whether the NSA revelations undermined trust in ICANN and the Internet and required the type of response we’re seeing. Instead, we saw the establishment of top‐down presidential strategy panels. We saw ‐‐ and I hate to say this ‐‐ a new low point in ICANN with the secret Board resolution last September that authorized the CEO to take many of the actions that have been taken…”

The resolution, issued in September 2013, was published a month after the October 2013 ICANN meeting that pushed for the globalization of ICANN. The October meeting called on members to sign the “Montevideo Statement on the Future of Internet Cooperation”. Corwin notes that “While the Montevideo Statement was signed by ten entities, the actual work of coordinating its issuance was performed by CEO Chehade pursuant to a secret resolution passed by the ICANN Board on September 28th.”

Corwin notes that “No consultation effort was engaged in with ICANN’s stakeholders and constituencies before these decisions were made.” The resolution states,

“Whereas, the existing, global, open, multi-stakeholder Internet governance system is under increasing pressure to evolve and adapt to global concerns.

Whereas these increasing pressures cannot be addressed by ICANN alone, but only by a group of similarly concerned organizations and entities acting in concert, ICANN should participate in an effort to form an Internet cooperation agenda (“Coalition”).

Resolved (2013-09-28-C1), the ICANN Board authorizes its CEO to allocate necessary and sufficient time and resources of ICANN and work with other key organizations and leaders to establish a coalition towards the formation of a movement or initiative. The financial resources for building the coalition must be allocated from the already established Strategic Plan funds.”

ICANN’s goal of an open and transparent internet doesn’t seem to coincide with the organization’s recent activities. The move to cede United States control over the internet is concerning for multiple reasons. Now that ownership is being fought for among the worlds repressive superpowers, freedom of speech on the net is in danger.

With ICANN now open to the world, a whole host of anxious governments and organizations are grabbing for the power that is the internet. The European Union, pushing for a “Web 3.0” that will facilitate the Internet of Things, is one potential player. “The European Commission’s position on jurisdiction and choice of law could lead to imposition of the European Union’s approach on data protection, cybersecurity, and other matters on entities outside its direct jurisdiction — including U.S. companies,” writes Corwin.

As former Bush administration State Department advisor Christian Whiton stated, ICANN may end up as part of the United Nations.

Similarly shady activity is taking place with the Trans-Pacific Partnership, which is seeking to impose corporate controlled internet regulation on its members. Senator Ron Wyden told Congress, “…the majority of Congress is being kept in the dark as to the substance of the TPP negotiations, while representatives of U.S. corporations – like Halliburton, Chevron, PHRMA, Comcast, and the Motion Picture Association of America – are being consulted and made privy to details of the agreement.”

UN Could Take Over ICANN, and the Internet, Oct. 1 written by Joel B. Pollak

The United Nations could take over control of the Internet on October 1, when the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) passes from U.S. administration to the control of a multilateral body, most likely the United Nations International Telecommunications Union (ITU).

While the administration and its defenders have denied that the UN will have authority over ICANN, the Wall Street Journal‘s L. Gordon Crovitz points out that ICANN will need to be run by a state agency in order to retain its antitrust exemption, which makes it almost certainly that the UN will step in to take control.

Crovitz notes:

It’s shocking the administration admits it has no plan for how Icann retains its antitrust exemption. The reason Icann can operate the entire World Wide Web root zone is that it has the status of a legal monopolist, stemming from its contract with the Commerce Department that makes Icann an “instrumentality” of government.

Without the U.S. contract, Icann would seek to be overseen by another governmental group so as to keep its antitrust exemption. Authoritarian regimes have already proposed Icann become part of the U.N. to make it easier for them to censor the internet globally. So much for the Obama pledge that the U.S. would never be replaced by a “government-led or an inter-governmental organization solution.”

UN control would almost certainly allow tyrannical regimes some degree of control over Americans’ Internet use.

Congress can still act to prevent the transfer: Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX) and Rep. Sean Duffy (R-WI) have introduced the Protecting Internet Freedom Act, which would prevent the transfer of ICANN without Congressional approval.

Leaked Soros Document Calls For Regulating Internet To Favor ‘Open Society’ Supporters by ZeroHedge

Aug 29 2016

Very soon, on October 1, 2016, much of the internet’s governance will shift from the US National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) authority to a nonprofit multi-stakeholder entity, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers, also known by its acronym ICANN. As The Gatestone Institute’s Judith Bergmann explains,

Until now, NTIA has been responsible for key internet domain name functions, such as the coordination of the DNS (Domain Name System) root, IP addresses, and other internet protocol resources. But in March 2014, the U.S. announced its plan to let its contract with ICANN to operate key domain name functions expire in September 2015,passing the oversight of the agency to a global governance model. The expiration was subsequently delayed until October 1, 2016.

 

According to the NTIA’s press release at the time, “NTIA’s responsibility includes the procedural role of administering changes to the authoritative root zone file – the database containing the lists of names and addresses of all top-level domains – as well as serving as the historic steward of the DNS. NTIA currently contracts with ICANN to carry out the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA) functions and has a Cooperative Agreement with Verisign under which it performs related root zone management functions. Transitioning NTIA out of its role marks the final phase of the privatization of the DNS as outlined by the U.S. Government in 1997”.

 

According to the NTIA, from the inception of ICANN, the U.S. government and internet stakeholders envisioned that the U.S. role in the IANA functions would be temporary. The Commerce Department’s June 10, 1998 Statement of Policy stated that the U.S. government “is committed to a transition that will allow the private sector to take leadership for DNS management.” The official reason, therefore, is that: “ICANN as an organization has matured and taken steps in recent years to improve its accountability and transparency and its technical competence. At the same time, international support continues to grow for the multi-stakeholder model of Internet governance as evidenced by the continued success of the Internet Governance Forum and the resilient stewardship of the various Internet institutions”.

The Obama Administration says that the transition will have no practical effects on the internet’s functioning or its users,and even considers the move necessary in order to maintain international support for the internet and to prevent a fracturing of its governance.

Oh really?

Civil society groups and activists are calling on Congress to sue the Obama Administration — perhaps at least to postpone the date until more Americans are aware of the plan.

However, never one to miss an opportunity, The Daily Caller’s Peter Hasson reports that:

An internal proposed strategy from George Soros’ Open Society Justice Initiative calls for international regulation of private actors’ decisions on “what information is taken off the Internet and what may remain.”

 

Those regulations, the document notes, should favor “those most supportive of open society.”

The Open Society Justice Initiative (OSJI) is part of the Open Society Foundations, Soros’s secretive network of political organizations. According to the organization’s website, “The Open Society Justice Initiative uses law to protect and empower people around the world, supporting the values and work of the Open Society Foundations.”

The call for international control of the internet is part of a 34-page document titled “2014 Proposed strategy” that lays out OSJI’s goals for between 2014 and 2017.

 

The leaked document was one of 2,500 documents released by “hacktivist” group DCLeaks. As reported by The Daily Caller, the section of DCLeaks’ website dealing with Soros has since gone offline for unknown reasons. TheDC saved a version of the 2014 strategy before the site went offline.

 

In the document, OSJI argues that international regulation of the Internet is needed to protect freedom of expression.

 

Our freedom of expression work furthers the free exchange of information and ideas via the media and internet, and proposes to begin to address the free expression and association rights of NGOs. The internet has been a key tool for promoting freedom of expression and open societies — as in the Arab Spring — and is a potential safeguard against monopoly control of information in such places as China and Central Asia,” page 19 of the document notes.

 

But it is also presenting underaddressed challenges, including lack of regulation of private operators that are able to decide, without due process procedures, what information is taken off the Internet and what may remain. A ‘race to the bottom’ results from the agendas of undemocratic governments that seek to impose their hostility to free speech on the general online environment. We seek to ensure that, from among the norms emerging in different parts of the world, those most supportive of open society gain sway.”

 

Open Society Justice Initiative Proposed 2014 Strategy Source: DCLeaks internet free speech

One of the “Program concepts and initiatives” listed in the document is to “Promote — by advocating for the adoption of nuanced legal norms, and litigation — an appropriate balance between privacy and free expression/transparency values in areas of particular interest to OSF and the Justice Initiative, including online public interest speech, access to ethnic data, public health statistics, corporate beneficial ownership, asset declarations of public officials, and rights of NGOs to keep information private.”

 

Another initiative is to “Establish states’ responsibility to collect data necessary to reveal patterns of inequality, and define modes of collection that are effective and protect privacy.”

 

Throughout the document, OSJI’s position appears to be that private actors on the internet must be brought under international control in order to prevent them from suppressing each other’s freedom of expression and speech.

 

One of the organization’s goals is to “Establish soft law and judicial precedents safeguarding online free expression, including adequate protection against blocking of online content, intermediary liability, user standing, and related issues.”

 

One weakness of current efforts to promote online free expression has been the relatively sparse and uneven use of the international human rights law framework, including protections for free speech. This may be due to the paucity of coordinated efforts to generate hard law, and some soft law, in this area, both domestically and internationally,” the document states later, before noting the opportunity for the organization to influence “international free speech law in the online environment.”

 

“One reason for this failure may be that the leading digital rights groups/movements have developed separately and at a certain distance from the traditional free speech groups (though this is beginning to change). The Justice Initiative, working with other OSF programs that fund leading players in both sub-fields, is well placed to help bridge that gap and promote the use and development of international free speech law in the online environment.”

The U.S. is set to cede control of the internet, stoking fears that the internet could eventually be subject to the United Nations instead.

internet free speech

OSF previously called DCLeaks’s release of the documents “a symptom of an aggressive assault on civil society and human rights activists that is taking place globally.”